December 2013 IVES Update Newsletter

We'll be covering: January 2014 revisions summary. What’s your trainer IQ? answer. A question on expired certifications. What’s Wrong With This? photo and answer. Interesting article links. Incident report on forklift operator fatality in California.


 Here’s some of the things we’ll share with you in this December 2013 IVES Update Newsletter…

  • January 2014 revisions summary.
  • What’s your trainer IQ? answer.
  • A question on expired certifications.
  • What’s Wrong With This? photo and answer.
  • Interesting article links.
  • Trade show & events schedule.
  • Incident report on forklift operator fatality in California.
  • But first we’d like to wish you a safe and Merry Christmas! Please note our offices will be closed for the holidays on December 25-26 and January 1.

January 2014 Revisions Summary

Below is a list of revisions which will be phased in over the period from January 1 to March 31. These are reasonably slight changes that will not render your current training materials obsolete, however we suggest that you try not to mix old and new materials as it may cause confusion with your trainees.

  1. Counterbalanced Forklift Operator Reference Manual
    a. Pg#32 – 2nd sentence – “from” inserted in 2nd sentence between “you” and “jumping.”
    b. Pg#40 & 44 – A “WARNING” has been added to the margins of both pages instructing operators working in warehouse racking to cordon off the opposite aisle or use a spotter to prevent people from entering the area and possibly being struck by falling items.
    c. Pg#50 – Item 9 – The reference to remaining “nearby” while elevating personnel has been removed in favor of wording that directs the operator to remain in the “operating position at all times while personnel are elevated.”
  2. Aerial Lifts Operator Reference Manual
    a. Pg#16 – ARTICULATED BOOM TYPE – “The boom section that connects to the platform can also telescope in and out” has been added as the 3rd sentence of the paragraph.
    b. Pg#45 – The “Model Year” listed on the data plate was changed from 1997 to 2014.
    c. Pg#47 – A “Did you know…?” box has been added explaining “ground pressure.” *This change affects DTA Trainer’s Companion Guide.
    d. Pg#47 – A Ground Pressure decal image has been added.
  3. Aerial Boomlift Operator Reference Manual
    a. Pg#18 – ARTICULATED BOOM TYPE – “The boom section that connects to the platform can also telescope in and out” has been added as the 3rd sentence of the paragraph.
    b. Pg#45 – The “Model Year” listed on the data plate was changed from 1997 to 2014.
    c. Pg#47 – A “Did you know…?” box has been added explaining “ground pressure.” *This change affects DTA Trainer’s Companion Guide.
    d. Pg#47 – A Ground Pressure decal image has been added.
  4. Scissor Lift Operator Reference Manual
    a. Pg#45 – ANSI standard date changed from 1999 to 2006.
  5. Loader Backhoe Operator Reference Manual
    a. Pg#65 – Pin locations on drawing of hoe bucket have been labeled.
  6. Rough Terrain Forklift Operator Reference Manual
    a. Pg#25 – “Winch Boom” reference and image removed.
  7. Rough Terrain Forklift Operator Theory Test & Answer Key
    a. Question #20 has been reworded from, “What is the heaviest load that can be lifted to a boom angle of 50˚ with 10ft. of boom extension with the outriggers up?” to, “What is the heaviest load that can be handled 10ft out from the front face of the tires to a 50˚ boom angle with the outriggers up?”
  8. Aerial Boomlift Digital Training Aid
    a. Frame #59 – Date on Mfrs data plate changed from 2002 to 2014.
    b. Frame #63 – Model specific information (Z45/25) removed from ground pressure decal image.
  9. Aerial Lifts Digital Training Aid
    a. Frame #59 – Date on Mfrs data plate changed from 2002 to 2014.
    b. Frame #63 – Model specific information (Z45/25) removed from ground pressure decal image.
    c. Frame #64 – Ground Pressure decal image added.
  10. Scissor Lift Digital Training Aid
    a. Frame #51 – Model year on mfrs. data plate date changed from 1998 to 2014.
    b. Frame #54 – Model specific information (Z45/25) removed from ground pressure decal image.
  11. Aerial Boomlift Digital Training Aid Trainer’s Companion Guide
    a. Pg#4 – DTA frame #63 – “NA” changed to “47.”
  12. Aerial Lifts Digital Training Aid Trainer’s Companion Guide
    a. Pg#4 – DTA frame #64 (1st occurrence) – “& ground pressure” added to frame description.
    b. Pg#4 – DTA frame #64 (2nd occurrence) – “Gross weight (same frame as above)” changed to “Same frame as above.”

Sign in to the Member Dashboard to download this document.


What’s Your Trainer IQ?

Here’s the question we gave you last month, along with the answer:

The operator of a counterbalanced lift truck picks up a load from the top of a high stack that is a bit too heavy. The operator tilts the load back, checks the rear clearance and slowly begins to back straight out from the stack. When the load is clear of the stack, the operator stops the truck and begins to lower the mast. As the mast comes down, the operator notices the truck seems to be getting less stable. As the mast continues down, the truck begins to teeter on its drive axle. The operator stops lowering the load and carefully returns it to its original position.

Q: Why did the truck remain reasonably stable with the load elevated and become unstable as the load was lowered?

A: Since the mast was titled back as the load was lowered, the load was actually moving forward as it came down toward the bottom. This caused the combined center of gravity of the truck to move forward as well. Because the load was described as being a “bit too heavy,” the CCG was further forward that it ought to have been. When the CCG got close enough to the front of the stability triangle (drive axle), the truck got “light” at the back end and began to teeter and would eventually cause the truck to nose over completely if the situation is was not reversed (e.g., raise the load back up).


Ask Bob

Q: On several occasions I’ve had operators who have been through the IVES training program several times and use the equipment often, however due to scheduling issues these individuals have gone past the three year certification – often only by a week or two. Is there a grace period on this? Is it something that the trainer can make the call if he/she feels they are up to the task?

A: Unfortunately there is no grace period for operators whose certifications/qualifications have lapsed. However, the good news is that you don’t have to put them through an entire training program again like the initial training they went through to become certified originally. What you have to do is evaluate their knowledge and skill which means a written theory test and practical hands on evaluation. If either of these exposes any weakness in knowledge or skill, then you must provide additional training in those areas. I would recommend using our operator recertification packages to help you get this done.


New Video! Introduction to Skid Steer Loaders

This video features an experienced trainer taking the viewer through a detailed inspection of a skid steer loader while explaining the main parts, safety features and operational controls. Get yours today for only $89.95. Login here or call 1-800-643-1144 to order.


What’s Wrong With This?

Can you tell what’s wrong with this photo? We’ll share our answer in next month’s newsletter.


Answer to Last Month’s WWWT?

Last month we showed you a photo of an aerial boomlift which had its directional arrows mixed up. This is very dangerous as it could confuse the operator and have them drive in the opposite direction they intended. Scary, right? That’s why it’s so important to do a thorough pre-use inspection, to find any defects in the equipment before using it!


Interesting News Articles

  • Forklift operator saves elderly man’s life… more
  • Lake county settles with OSHA in excavator operator fatality… more
  • Ontario blitz targets warehouses and forklifts… more
  • A video of a split ring tire exploding in slow motion… more
  • Worker pinned under forklift killed in accident… more
  • Boomlift operators rescued after being stranded mid-air (photo below)… more

Incident Report

A 27-year-old man was killed in a forklift accident at a craft brewing company in Escondido.

According to a report released Sunday by the county medical examiner’s office, the victim was operating a forklift when, for unknown reasons, the machine rolled.

Officials say the victim sustained fatal injuries to the chest. He was transported to Palomar Medical Center where he was pronounced dead a short time later.

The incident remains under investigation, and police say officials from OSHA will handle the case. Officials said the investigation could take up to six months.

An OSHA representative also said in the last five years there haven’t been any workplace safety complaints at the company.

NBC 7 reached out to the company for comment and the company’s public relations specialist, released the following statement:

“It is with a very heavy heart that we communicate a tragedy involving one of our valued friends and… colleagues. We are deeply saddened that one of our own passed away from complications resulting from a forklift accident at our Escondido brewery on Saturday, August 24. Our deepest condolences go out to the team member’s family. Out of respect for the team member’s loved ones, we are not releasing the individual’s name at this time…

We will refrain from commenting further until additional details and information is acquired and the investigation into this incident is complete. Thank you for the outpouring of support we have already received. Our sympathy is with the family and everyone affected by this tragedy.”

[Source: www.nbcsandiego.com]


Client Testimonials

“Great class structure and materials. As always, your trainers are top shelf! Your program is great!” Baldwin, REC Silicon.

“All very good. Outstanding job.” James, DTE Energy.

“Trainer kept the class on subject and was easy to follow. I would recommend this class to anyone.” Christopher, Fetzer Vineyards.


Did you enjoy this newsletter? Sign up for our newsletter to receive more like this!